Dec 4, 2009

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10 Movie Explosions

Explosions in the films are very common. It is difficult today to find the movies in which no one blast during the movie. This is an example of 10 movies with explosions. So, check it out.
10. DEJA VU
deja vu 10 Movie Explosions
Déjà Vu is a 2006 crime thriller with elements of science fiction. The film was directed by Tony Scott, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and co-written by Bill Marsilii and Terry Rossio. The film stars Denzel Washington, Jim Caviezel, and Paula Patton as the main characters, but also includes actors Val Kilmer, Adam Goldberg and Matt Craven. Déjà Vu involves ATF agent Douglas Carlin, who travels back in time in attempts to prevent a domestic terrorist attack that takes place in New Orleans and to save a woman whom he falls in love with, Claire Kuchever. Filming took place throughout post-Katrina New Orleans.[citation needed].

The film premiered in New York City on November 20, 2006. It was released to the United States two days later, and to Mexico and Canada by the end of November. The film was released worldwide by the early months of 2007. It received mixed reviews from critics, and the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes’s compiled ratings give the film a below average rating. While earning $64 million in the United States, the film went on to gross $180 million worldwide; Déjà Vu was the twenty-third most successful film worldwide for 2006. The film was nominated for five awards, and won the International Golden Reel Award presented by Neilsen EDI.

9. BAD BOYS 2
Bad Boys 2 10 Movie Explosions
Eight years after the events of the first film, Detective Mike Lowrey and Detective Marcus Burnett are investigating the flow of ecstasy into Miami. Their intel and surveillance of boats coming in from Cuba leads them to a KKK meeting/drug drop in a swamp, Mike accidentally shoots Marcus in the buttocks which leads Marcus to further question if he still wants to partner with Mike.

Meanwhile, a neurotic Cuban kingpin named Johnny Tapia (Jordi Molla), who supplies Miami’s drug traffic, wonders why his boats are picked up by the cops and tells his men to change the schedules once again. Two members of the Russian Mob, Alexei and Josef, receive drugs from Tapia to run their nightclub businesses, but end up giving nearly half of their profits to Tapia. Alexei and Josef go to negotiate with Tapia to recoup some of their profits, but this ends in Josef’s murder by Tapia’s men and Alexei’s forced surrender of his Russian nightclubs after his wife and son are threatened by Tapia.

8. DIE ANOTHER DAY
Die Another Day 10 Movie Explosions
Die Another Day (2002) is the twentieth spy film in the James Bond series, and the fourth and last to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. In the pre-title sequence, Bond leads a mission to North Korea, during which he is found out and, after killing a rogue North Korean colonel, he is captured and imprisoned. More than a year later, Bond is released as part of a prisoner exchange, and, surmising that someone within the British government betrayed him, he follows a trail of clues in an effort to earn redemption by finding his betrayer and learning the intentions of billionaire Gustav Graves, who in typical Bond fashion is not all he seems.

Die Another Day, produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, and directed by Lee Tamahori, marks the franchise’s 40th anniversary (begun in 1962 with Sean Connery starring in Dr. No). It includes references to each of the preceding films and also alludes to several Bond novels.

The 2002 film received mixed reviews—some critics praised Lee Tamahori’s work on the film, while others pointed out the damage caused to the plot by the excessive use of CGI. In spite of its flaws, it became the highest grossing James Bond film to that date. It was distributed by MGM themselves in North America, and internationally through 20th Century Fox. The MPAA rated this movie (in edited version) PG-13 for Intense Sequences of Action Violence, and Sexual Content including Innuendo.

7. DIE HARD 4.0
Die Hard 10 Movie Explosions
Live Free or Die Hard, (released as Die Hard 4.0 outside of North America), is a 2007 action film, and the fourth installment in the Die Hard series. The film was directed by Len Wiseman and stars Bruce Willis as John McClane, the protagonist of the first three films. Supporting cast members included Justin Long, Timothy Olyphant, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, and Maggie Q. The storyline takes place 19 years after the first film, and finds McClane facing a gang of cyber terrorists. The film was based on the 1997 article “A Farewell to Arms” written for Wired magazine by John Carlin.[2] The film’s North American release date was June 27, 2007.[1]

After the project was stalled due to the September 11, 2001 attacks, production eventually began, and the film’s title was switched several times. A variety of visual effects were used for action sequences, even though Wiseman and Willis stated that they wanted to limit the amount of CGI in the film. In separate incidents during filming, both Willis and his stunt double were injured. Unlike the prior three films in the series, the US rating was PG-13 rather than R. An unrated version of Live Free or Die Hard containing profanity and violence not included in the theatrical version was made available for the DVD release.

Live Free or Die Hard received generally positive reviews, earning a 81% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes and 69/100 from Metacritic. The film had total international box office gross receipts of $383.5 million. For the DVD release, 20th Century Fox pioneered a new kind of DRM, Digital Copy, that tries to weaken the incentives for consumers to learn how to rip discs by offering them a downloadable version with studio-imposed restrictions. The score for the film was released on July 2, 2007.

6. MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE
Mission Impossible 10 Movie Explosions
Mission: Impossible is an 1996 action thriller directed by Brian De Palma and stars Tom Cruise as Ethan Hunt. The plot follows Hunt’s (Tom Cruise) mission to uncover the mole within the CIA who has framed him for the murders of his entire IMF team. Work on the script had begun early with late filmmaker Sydney Pollack on board, before De Palma, Steven Zaillian, David Koepp, and Robert Towne were brought in. In fact, the film went into pre-production without a shooting script. De Palma came up with some action sequences, but neither Koepp nor Towne were satisfied with the story that leads up to these events.

U2 band members Larry Mullen Jr. and Adam Clayton produced their own version of the original theme song. The song went into top ten charts around the world and was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance. The movie was the third highest grossing of the year. It is the first movie based on the television series of the same name and was followed by two sequels, Mission: Impossible II (2000) and Mission: Impossible III (2006).

5. APOCALYPSE NOW
Apocalypse now 10 Movie Explosions
Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epic war film set during the Vietnam War. The plot revolves around two US Army special operations officers, one of whom, Captain Benjamin L. Willard (Martin Sheen) of MACV-SOG, is sent into the jungle to assassinate the other, the rogue and presumably insane Colonel Walter E. Kurtz (Marlon Brando) of Special Forces. The film was produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a script by Coppola and John Milius. The script is based on Joseph Conrad’s novella Heart of Darkness, and also draws elements from Michael Herr’s Dispatches, the film version of Conrad’s Lord Jim (which shares the same character of Marlow with Heart of Darkness), and Werner Herzog’s Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972).[1]

The film became notorious in the entertainment press due to its lengthy and troubled production, as documented in Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse. Marlon Brando showed up to the set overweight and Martin Sheen suffered a heart attack. The production was also beset by extreme weather that destroyed several expensive sets. In addition, the release date of the film was delayed several times as Coppola struggled to come up with an ending and to edit the millions of feet of footage that he had shot.

The film won the Cannes Palme d’Or and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama.

4. ARMAGEDDON
armageddon 10 Movie Explosions
Armageddon is a 1998 disaster/science fiction-action film about a group of blue-collar deep-core drillers who are sent by NASA to stop an Asteroid on a collision course with Earth. It was directed by Michael Bay, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and released on Disney’s Touchstone Pictures label. It stars Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton, Ben Affleck, Liv Tyler, Michael Clarke Duncan, Peter Stormare and Steve Buscemi.

Armageddon arrived in theaters only two and a half months after a similar impact-based movie, Deep Impact, which starred Morgan Freeman. Astronomers described Deep Impact as being more scientifically accurate,[2], but Armageddon fared better at the box office.[3] They were about equally well-received by critics (Armageddon scoring 41% and Deep Impact scoring 46% on the ‘Tomatometer’).

Due to a fire that destroyed the master print of the film, if Armageddon were to be released on Blu-ray, it would have to be remastered.

3. TERMINATOR
Terminator 2 10 Movie Explosions
The Terminator is a 1984 science fiction action film directed and co-written by James Cameron and distributed by the independent film studio Orion Pictures. It features Arnold Schwarzenegger as The Terminator, Linda Hamilton as Sarah Connor and Michael Biehn as Kyle Reese. The film was followed by three sequels. The franchise has evolved to include video games and a television series.

The film takes place in 1984, introducing the concept of a “Terminator”, specifically the titular character (Arnold Schwarzenegger), a seemingly unstoppable cyborg assassin who has been sent back from the year 2029 by a collective of artificially intelligent computer-controlled machines bent on the extermination of the human race. The Terminator’s mission is to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton) whose future son, John Connor, leads a resistance against the machines. A human, Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), is also sent back from the future by John Connor himself to protect her.

In 2008, The Terminator was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”

2. THE MATRIX RELOADED
The Matrix Relaoded 10 Movie Explosions
he Matrix Reloaded is a 2003 film, the second installment in The Matrix trilogy, written and directed by the Wachowski Brothers. It premiered on May 7, 2003, in Westwood, Los Angeles, California, and went on general release by Warner Bros. in North American theatres on May 15, 2003, and around the world during the latter half of that month. It was also screened out of competition at the 2003 Cannes Film Festival. The video game Enter the Matrix, which was released May 15, and a collection of nine animated shorts, the Animatrix, which was released on June 3, supported and expanded the storyline of the movie. The Matrix Revolutions, which completes the story, was released six months after Reloaded in November 2003
1. STAR TREK
star trek vulcan 10 Movie Explosions
Star Trek is a 2009 science fiction film directed by J. J. Abrams, written by Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman, and distributed by Paramount Pictures. It is the eleventh film based on the Star Trek franchise and features the main characters of the original Star Trek television series, who are portrayed by a new cast. The film follows James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) and Spock (Zachary Quinto) before they unite aboard the USS Enterprise to combat Nero (Eric Bana), a Romulan from their future who threatens the United Federation of Planets. The story establishes an alternate reality through time-travel by both Nero and the original Spock (Leonard Nimoy), freeing the film and the franchise from established continuity constraints.

Development of the film began in 2005. The production’s aim was to be faithful to the Star Trek canon, modifying continuity with the time-travel storyline, and modernizing the production design of the original show. Filming took place from November 2007 to March 2008 under intense secrecy. Midway through the shoot, Paramount chose to delay the release date from December 25, 2008 to May 2009, believing the film could reach a wider audience.

Star Trek earned high critical praise, gaining a 95% on Rotten Tomatoes. It is the tenth-highest-grossing film of 2009 — fifth-highest within North America — and has become the highest-grossing film in the Star Trek series and is credited by the media as a reboot of the series.

  1. Nice Explosions..! Good Job ..!

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